Marshfield: Seawall committee works together with neighboring communities

South shore coastal communities try to band together for sake of the sea line and residents.

Wednesday night the Marshfield Seawall Committee met and reviewed information regarding an October meeting with the Metropolitan Area Planning Council. Marshfield, Scituate, and Duxbury have joined forces to share information about how their community preserves seawalls and ways to protect against sea level rise.

With 70% of the state population living in coastal communities, maintaining and building seawalls have been a reoccurring issue for many local areas.

Marshfield DPW Commissioner Mike Valenti stated how important it is for neighboring towns to help each other, “We need to really look at planning wise, regionally planning wise, and that’s something the planning department is working on but this committee could get involved in as well and that’s going to be a limitless task.”

According to committee Chair Joe Rossi, the Hull Conservation Administrator was at the MAPC meeting and stated that Hull has made an aggressive effort to protect coastline residents, “The towns around us have made the moves to initiate these different bylaws, just things to add to the protection of the coastline not to just say ‘oh see ya seawalls’ and put the houses up instead. But to say alright we’ll protect the coasts and have these set of bylaws.”

Hull bylaws promote alternate ways to dealing with sea level rise other than more seawalls, such as raising houses and annually warning residents who are in flood zones.

There are currently three openings on the Marshfield Seawall Committee; Chair Rossi stated that they are looking for more bodies to help drive the committee along and further regionalization with other towns.

Committee members from these towns continue to share information and work together by attending other seawall committee meetings.

About Trisha McNeilly

With a Bachelor’s Degree in American Studies from the University of Massachusetts-Boston under her belt, Trisha McNeilly joins us full-time as a general assignment and breaking news reporter having previously interned for WBZ-1030 AM in Boston. A South Shore resident her whole life, McNeilly grew up in Pembroke and is 22-years old.