Nautical News: For the week of May 27th, 2012

MAN KILLED DELIVERING FUEL TO COMMUTER BOAT

A 42-year old oil truck driver was killed while he was training another man on how to pump diesel fuel into a Harbor Express commuter boat at the Quincy Shipyard. Apparently, while the driver was opening a gate to get closer to the commuter boat, the truck rolled down a slight incline pinning and crushing the man against the fence. The other person in the truck drove the truck off the victim and then called for help. The victim was taken to Quincy Medical Center where he was pronounced dead. The last fatal accident at the Quincy shipyard was in 2008 when ironworker Robert Harvey was killed when dismantling the crane known as Goliath.


FIRE ABOARD NUCLEAR POWERED SUBMARINE

Four firefighters were injured while battling a fire aboard the USS Miami nuclear-powered attack submarine dry-docked at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. Navy officials said the reactor was not involved and that there is no danger to the public. The fire was located in a forward compartment of the ship and the ship’s reactor was not operating at the time.


COMMUTER BOAT CREW FINDS BODY IN QUINCY BAY

The body of a 72 year old Wrentham man was found floating in Quincy Bay not too far from Peddocks Island by the crew of a passing commuter boat. The body was brought to Pemberton pier in Hull where Mass State Police, Mass Environmental Police, Hull Police, the Coast Guard and the Hull Harbormaster all met. The Hull Harbormaster was able to identify the body. Police also found the man’s car parked near the pier. No foul play was suspected.


3000 PARTICIPATE IN 41ST FIGAWI RACE

The 41st Annual Figawi Race got underway this Memorial Day weekend. It is recognized as a top sailing event not only on the east coast, but is known nationally and around the world. The race course goes from Hyannis to Nantucket and back. About 250 boats and more than 3,000 people are expected to participate in this year’s event.


SCITUATE BOAT WORKS OPENS NEW BUILDING

Scituate Boat Works recently completed construction of its new marine services building at the Scituate Harbor marina. The new building will allow the boatyard to work on boats year-round as well as provide indoor storage. Scituate Boat Works won the bid to manage the town owned property and marina in 2009 and has a lease good through 2039. The company celebrated the grand opening of its new building, at 119 Edward Foster Road, this Memorial Day weekend.


“DEADLIEST CATCH” CREWMAN FIGHTS FLESH EATING DISEASE

The former deck boss on the crab boat Wizard on TV’s “Deadliest Catch” is battling the deadly flesh eating bacteria known as necrotizing fasciitis. Michael “Bear” Rogers said that he does not know how or where he contracted the deadly bacteria, but it has already cost him his leg. Rogers, now 59, said he is just thankful to be alive.


TV NETWORK REPORTS EATING FARMED SHRIMP DANGEROUS

ABC World News the other night ran a story about the dangers of eating farmed shrimp, putting a negative light on Asia’s farmed shrimp industry. According to their report, the shrimp farmers in Asia use antibiotics and other chemicals that are prohibited in the United States. They do this because most of the shrimp that are sent to the United States from India, Thailand, and Viet Nam are raised in small, crowded pens with conditions that promote the spread of disease. The National Fisheries Institute was also interviewed for the TV network’s story. Gavin Gibbons from the National Fisheries Institute was our featured guest last week.


FIRST FEMALE TO TAKE COMMAND OF BRITISH WARSHIP

And last on today’s nautical news, the British navy has been around for 500 years and until now, every warship has seen a man as the captain. Now, for the first time in history, 40 year old Sarah West has become the first female to take command of a British warship. She is in command of the HMS Portland leading a crew of 185 — a crew of mostly men. The first woman to command a warship in the United States Navy was Maureen Farren in 1998, and just recently, women were allowed to become submariners.


About John Shea