Nautical News: For the week of July 29th, 2012

BOAT FALLS ON WORKER

A worker who was painting the bottom of a 35 foot boat at the Standish Boat Yard in Tiverton, Rhode Island was in critical condition at the Rhode Island Hospital after a jack stand collapsed or moved, causing the boat to fall on top of him, crushing his abdomen and chest. Tiverton Police identified the man as 25 year old Kyle St. Pierre, the son in law of the owner of the boatyard. Bystanders in the yard said a fellow co-worker rushed to use the forklift to raise the boat. Officials from OSHA are investigating the accident.


E15 WARNING LABELS DISTRIBUTED TO BOATBUILDERS

The National Marine Manufacturers Association is distributing 100,000 E15 warning labels this week to boatbuilders across the country to place on their boats in hopes of alerting boaters of the potential dangers of E15 ethanol. The labels warn the buyers of the boats not use E15 ethanol. Contrary to numerous studies that have shown the E15 ethanol to be hazardous to marine engines, the Obama administration still approved its sale.


CLAM SEEDS PLANTED IN BOSTON HARBOR

Biologists working with local environmental groups are trying to rebuild Boston Harbor’s soft shell clam population. They are planting “seed clams” along the mud flats off Thompson Island. Officials said clams are an important food source for local sea life and could create more jobs for shellfishermen. The director of the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries said more than 6 million seed clams had been planted in almost 400 plots around Boston Harbor during the past 6 years.


WORLD WAR II GERMAN U-BOAT FOUND OFF NANTUCKET

Divers have discovered a World War II German submarine nearly 70 years after it sank in deep water approximately 70 miles off Nantucket. The German U-Boat, the U-550 was found by a group who had been searching for it the past 20 years. Side-scan sonar showed the wreck lying on its side. Government officials said on April 16, 1944, the U-550 torpedoed the gasoline tanker SS Pan Pennsylvania as it headed for England with 140,000 barrels of gasoline on board. One of the tanker’s three navy escorts, the USS Joyce, saw the U Boat on sonar and severely damaged it by dropping depth charges. The Germans were forced to surface. Another escort vessel, the USS Gandy, rammed the U-boat while it was on the surface. The third escort, the USS Peterson, then hit the U-boat with two more depth charges. The Germans abandoned the submarine, but not before setting off explosions to scuttle it. The submarine hadn’t been seen again until this past week.


COAST GUARD RESCUES 8 PEOPLE IN THE WATER

The Coast Guard rescued eight persons in the water after their 21 foot boat sank approximately two miles east of Dennis Cape Cod. The Coast Guard received the call for help around 1 in the afternoon. The caller reported that the boat was taking on water. A Coast Guard Station Cape Cod Canal boat crew rushed to the area and located and retrieved all eight people safely from the water.


18 FOOT LONG GREAT WHITE SPOTTED CLOSE TO BEACH

Another great white shark was spotted close to shore off Chatham. This one was 18 feet long according to the Cape Cod Shark Hunters, a group that photographs and tags the sharks. For the latest great white shark sightings, go to www.capecodsharkhunters.com.


PLANE TOWING BANNER CRASHES INTO SEA

And last on today’s nautical news, a plane towing a “Will You Marry Me” banner crashed into the water off Block Island. The Coast Guard rushed to rescue the pilot who was the only one on board the plane. A good Samaritan boater also went to the aid of the pilot and picked him out of the water. The pilot was not injured. As for the marriage proposal, we believe the answer was a great big yes.

About WATD Web Editor

WATD online and on-air contributors include, but are not limited to: The Associated Press, Precision Weather Forecasting, local news stringers and reporters, in-house news and internet media staff, State House and town hall reporters, freelance reporters, special feature reporters/producers and on-air radio personnel.