Nautical News: For the week of July 28, 2013

BRIDE TO BE DIES IN DEADLY BOATING ACCIDENT

This past Friday night, a 21 foot power boat carrying six friends who were to participate in a wedding, crashed into a construction barge near the Tappan Zee Bridge on New York’s Hudson River. All six were thrown into the water. The groom was knocked unconscious, but when he woke, he was able to call 911. Four of the six were rescued and transported to the hospital, but the bride and the groom’s best man went missing. The next morning, investigators found the body of a 30 year old female who was believed to be the bride. The search for the missing man was suspended. The driver of the boat was charged with vehicular manslaughter and vehicular assault. He was arraigned from his hospital bed and ordered held on $250,000 bail. The wedding was scheduled for August 10th.


SEARCH FOR MAN OVERBOARD ON BOSTON BOOZE CRUISE

Closer to home, the Coast Guard and police boats searched throughout the night for a man who went overboard from the Provincetown II passenger boat near Castle Island in Boston Harbor. The company that owned the boat advertised the event as a country music booze cruise featuring the happiest captain in Boston harbor. The air temperature was 74 degrees and the water temperature was 65 degrees making chances of survival slim.


BOAT DRIFTS AWAY FROM TWO COHASSET DIVERS

Two Cohasset divers, who were left stranded on the rocks near Minot’s Beach after their boat drifted away, were rescued by a passing boater. The Cohasset Harbormaster said the two divers, who were about 20 years old, did not secure their boat properly when they went diving. When they surfaced, their boat was gone. There was no word about who found their boat.


NEW YORK LOBSTERMAN FOUND FLOATING 43 MILES OFFSHORE

A New York lobsterman was saved after he fell off a lobster boat at night and floated in the ocean for the next 12 hours. Fishing boats searched throughout the night along with four Coast Guard boats and two rescue helicopters. The accident happened about 43 miles south of Montauk, New York. The rescued lobsterman was taken to Falmouth hospital on Cape Cod where he was evaluated and treated for dehydration, exposure, and hypothermia. He said he used his rubber boats as flotation devices to help him stay afloat. Senior Chief Petty Officer Jason Walter, the officer in charge of Station Montauk. “To find this man in the water after this much time is amazing.”


SAIL BOARD FOUND ON BEACH CAUSES EXPENSIVE SEARCH

It happened again. This time it was near New Bedford. Police, the harbormaster, and the Coast Guard using boats and a helicopter, conducted a lengthy and expensive search for a possible missing windsurfer after people called reporting an empty sailboard washed up on the beach. The search was eventually called off after the owner of the sailboard called police to report he had left his windsurfing board on the beach and was not in distress. Owners of paddle boats and boards are urged to put their contact information on their boats and boards so they can be easily identified and contacted.


REPORT ON RISING SEA LEVELS FOR MARSHFIELD, DUXBURY, SCITUATE

Consultants hired by the towns of Marshfield, Duxbury, and Scituate have just completed their study about rising ocean levels. Their report will be released at a public meeting in Marshfield at 7 p.m. tomorrow night at Haddad’s Ocean Cafe, which is at 291 Ocean St. in Brant Rock. All residents are encouraged to attend. The study was funded with a $30,000 grant from the Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment.


OYSTERS STOLEN FROM CAPE COD SHELLFISH FARMS

Thieves have stolen more than $40,000 in oysters and equipment from Cape Cod oyster beds and now oyster trays are washing up on beaches in Brewster and Eastham, the only evidence left behind by oyster thieves who have repeatedly struck the tidal flats this summer. One farmer is now offering a $1,000 reward for information leading authorities to the poachers. Authorities said that the thieves know a great deal about oyster farms and one time even stopped to eat about a dozen oysters while robbing the flats. Some farmers believe a wholesale oyster dealer might be involved with the thefts because all oysters sold in Massachusetts must be documented when and where they came from. On the other hand, these oysters might be sold outside of Massachusetts. Even so, officials have warned food establishments, particularly raw bars, about serving unregulated shellfish.


BRUNSWICK CORP FINDS BUYER FOR HATTERAS AND CABO

In the business world of boating, it appears that Brunswick Corporation has finally found a buyer Hatteras Yachts and Cabo Sportfish Boats. It was reported that Navis HCY Acquisition, an affiliate of Versa Capital Management, LLC, has entered into a purchase and sale agreement for the two well known boat brands. Versa also owns Polartec, Bob’s Stores, and Eastern Mountain Sports, to name a few.


OFFICIALS WORRIED ABOUT NEW DEAD ZONE IN NARRAGANSETT BAY

Remember a couple of weeks ago we reported a large dead zone was building in the Gulf of Mexico. The dead zone was being caused by the fertilizer used in corn fields to make ethanol. Now it is feared that a large dead zone could occur in Upper Narragansett Bay and Greenwich Bay in Rhode Island. Marine biologists have put health officials in those areas on high alert because of low oxygen levels in the water that could result in a massive fish kill. Lawn fertilizer, road run off, and private septic systems are believed to be the cause of the problem. Residents around Greenwich Bay remember the last great fish kill that happened back in 2003 when more than a million dead fish were seen either floating or washed on shore.


WWII WRECKAGE AND COAST GUARD MIAs FOUND UNDER ICE

When an Army Air Forces B-17 crashed on the Greenland ice cap during World War II, two Coast Guardsmen volunteered for the rescue mission to retrieve the lost crew. On the first day of the rescue mission, some of the air men were rescued. On the second day, after picking up another one of the air men, the rescue plane crashed in a snowstorm. The Coast Guard pilot, his radio man, and the rescued soldier went missing, and the crash site was never found until last year. On July 30th, a team of Coasties, contractors, and other officials are expected to be at the site to start retrieving whatever human remains are found on the plane. The two Coast Guardsmen represent the service’s last two WWII MIAs. The latest effort by the service to locate the remains of the Coasties started in 2008. The Coast Guard was worried that global warming would expose the crash site to salvagers, but the plane was located about 38 feet below the ice using ground penetrating radar.


COAST GUARD’S EAGLE DOCKS NEXT TO OLD IRONSIDES

The Coast Guard’s training ship, the three masted Eagle, will be docked in Boston next to the USS Constitution in Charlestown and will be open to the public today for free tours until 6PM. At 295 feet in length, the Eagle is America’s largest tall ship and the only active square-rigger in U.S. government service. Built in 1936 in Germany, and named the Horst Wessle after a Nazi party member, the Eagle was taken by the United States as a war reparation following World War II.


SAILBOAT ABANDONED OFF BERMUDA LANDS ON MARTHA’S VINEYARD

And last on today’s nautical news, After 54 days at sea adrift, a 1976 36 foot Pearson sail boat washed up on a sandy spit of land on the south side of Martha’s Vineyard relatively unscathed. It was last seen by its owner off the coast of Bermuda when he abandoned her due to bad weather and was rescued by a passing oil tanker. The sail boat’s boom was broken and its sail shredded, but all the electronics were still on and working, as was its solar charging system when it was found on Martha’s Vineyard. The owner of the boat admitted that he thought he never would see the boat again, but somehow, the boat drifted through the East Coast shipping lanes, avoided the New England rocky shoreline, and safely beached herself 700 miles from where she was left on her own. Now he thinks maybe he should have stayed with the boat while it was adrift.


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