Nautical News: For the week of September 15, 2013

FIRE DESTROYS MARSHFIELD LOBSTER BOAT

Last week we reported that firefighters extinguished a small smoky fire on a lobster boat moored off Damon’s Point in Marshfield. This week, we are reporting that a second fire broke out on the same boat, and the results were quite different. The 42 foot lobster boat, the Aries II, was a total loss. The Marshfield harbormaster said, “The boat is down to the hull. There’s nothing left to it.” By the time officials from Scituate and Marshfield found the boat, it was fully engulfed in flames. The fire burned the boat’s mooring line, so it was adrift with no one on board. First responders pushed the boat toward shallow water so that it wouldn’t sink and so that the fire could be fought from land. Marshfield Harbormaster Mike DeMeo said it took more than six hours to completely extinguish the flames. Investigators are now determining the cause of the fire.

 

COAST GUARD GRABS 1200 POUNDS OF COCAINE OFF CAPE COD

This past week, the Coast Guard crew aboard the Cutter Dependable intercepted a shipment of more than 1,200 pounds of cocaine and detained two suspected smugglers approximately 500 miles east of Cape Cod. The cocaine had an estimated wholesale value of more than $20 million. The Coast Guard said they noticed that the 49 foot sailboat named Elegance, flying a Canadian flag, was riding suspiciously low in the water. Because the boat was in international waters and flying the Canadian flag, the Coast Guard had to get permission from the Canadian government before boarding the sailboat. Both crewmembers and the cocaine were brought aboard the Cutter Dependable and the sailboat was taken in tow back to Boston to awaiting U.S. Marshall Service and Drug Enforcement Administration officials. A government official said that on average, the Coast Guard nationwide seizes 306 pounds of cocaine every day.

 

UNDERWATER ROBOTS USED TO IMPROVE HURRICANE FORECASTS

NOAA and Rutgers University have teamed up using underwater robots off the east coast to collect data that could help improve future hurricane forecasts. The robots are now roaming underwater between Maine and Georgia and will continue to do so until the end of October. During the mission, the robots will also collect acoustic data about fish and mammals.

 

WRECK OF COSTA CONCORDIA FLOATED UPRIGHT

Salvagers hope to upright of the Costa Concordia cruise ship tomorrow morning and have it floating on underwater platforms that have been welded to the ship’s hull. The cruise ship has been lying on its side, partly submerged in shallow waters off the Italian island of Giglio, since it hit the rocks in January 2012. Workers hope to find the bodies of two people when the ship is upright.

 

SAILING MOVIE COULD BE OSCAR WINNER

Robert Redford stars in a new sailing movie that you will not want to miss. Its title is ‘All is Lost’. In the movie he is a solo sailor and because he is the only character in the movie, there is hardly any dialogue. The movie premiered at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival and viewers say it could be an Oscar winner. “All Is Lost” is scheduled for release on October 18th.

 

JAMES BOND SUBMARINE CAR SOLD AT AUCTION

What was considered the greatest James Bond car of all times, the James Bond “submarine car” used in the movie “The Spy Who Loved Me,” was sold in London $967,120. The price was much lower than expected because the Lotus was not a functional car. Although equipped with fins and propellers, it did not have wheels. In the movie, it was used only for the underwater scenes. Still, the sale was a huge windfall for the man who found the submarine car in a Long Island storage container in 1989. The man, a construction contractor bought the contents of a storage container for under $100 hoping to find some power tools. So, the 1964 Aston Martin used in “Goldfinger” still holds the title of the greatest James Bond car. It sold for $4.6 million in 2010.

 

MOLASSES SPILLS INTO HONOLULU HARBOR

And last on today’s nautical news, the Hawaii State Department of Health has confirmed that the brown substance that is polluting Honolulu Harbor, causing the death of many marine animals and fish, is molasses that spilled into the harbor from a ruptured pipeline. Officials said about 233,000 gallons of molasses had entered the harbor Although molasses is not harmful to people, the public is still advised not to swim in the water or eat any of the fish that are covered with the syrup. Furthermore, the dead animals and fish in the water are attracting sharks.

 

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