Plymouth, Plympton: New solar farm powering high school opens

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It was a sunny day on the South Shore yesterday, perfect weather to show off a new solar farm. The more than 23,000 panels at what was Plympton Sand and Gravel are now giving juice to Plymouth public schools after a ribbon cutting yesterday. The farm is evidence that Plymouth isn’t going to go with the educational status quo, according to Superintendent Gary Maestas.

“The problem that we have in education is that we keep doing things the way they’ve been done in the past. We realize that we have to change that model. We can’t continue to just do the same thing over and over, year after year,” said Plymouth Schools Superintendent Dr. Gary Maestas. “If we want to be competitive, if we want to give our students opportunities that they didn’t have before. We have to actually have to try something different. We’re going to keep doing it, and I think this is evidence of trying something different.

Senate President Therese Murray says she was receptive to the idea when it was brought to her, but it initially hit some road blocks on the location.

“Originally, it was supposed to go on the roof of the new high school. When they realized they couldn’t do that, they went to do a field behind the school and they didn’t have enough property,” said Senate President Therese Murray. “It turns out that Plympton had this property. It’s a win-win for both towns.”

The solar farm is expected to save the school district around $400,000 a year in electricity costs.

Officials cut the ribbon on the new solar farm

Officials cut the ribbon on the new solar farm

About Steve Burns

Steve comes to the South Shore by way of the Jersey Shore. Upon arriving at Emerson College in Boston back in 2010, and eventual graduation in 2014, Steve was immediately attracted to radio as an outlet for his reporting. Previous stops before the South Shore include WOBM on the Jersey Shore, WCCM in the Merrimack Valley, an internship at CBS Radio News' flagship station, WCBS 880 in New York City, and a few formative years at Emerson's WERS.