Carver: Annual election results; moving forward with new faces

The town of Carver will be moving forward with four new faces in town government after 1,520 residents cast their votes at Saturday’s annual election.

Town Clerk Lynn Doyle said the voter turnout of about 19% of voters this year was “average.”

“Last year we had 28%, we had a huge showing last year, “ Doyle said, “This is more average than what we’ve had in the past five or six years.”

Two new Selectmen, Alan Dunham and Ronald Clarke will be filling the vacant seats of Michael O’Donnell and Jack Franey.

Dunham said he is “really overwhelmed” with the support he received. “For a first time person to get the top vote is really amazing,” he said.

Dunham received 1,097 votes, and Clarke followed not too far behind with 1,036.

Clarke complimented both his fellow candidates. “It was a great campaign, very civil, which is different from what it’s been in the past couple of years,” he said. “I think it bodes well for the future of elected politics in town that maybe we can sort of come together and agree to disagree, rather than making it personal.”

Clarke added that his top three goals are to get the new Elementary School built, attack the war on heroin that’ is “rampant” in town, and regroup the senior support system in town.

James Hoffman won the race for Planning Board and Charles Boulay for Redevelopment Authority. Both ran against candidates for re-election.

Hoffman said this was his first time running. He hopes to bring a “fresh voice and new perspective” to the board.

Hoffman’s goal is to make sure that all the neighbors and abutters have proper representation for all projects going forward. “That’s the main reason I ran,” he said.

All other races in the election were uncontested.

 

About Samantha Tracey

Samantha Tracey graduated from Salem State University in 2013 with a degree in Journalism. She has been reporting on local issues in a variety of towns: Bridgewater, Abington, Carver, Weymouth, East Bridgewater, Hanson, Halifax, etc. She says growing up on the South Shore has made it interesting now to be covering news in such familiar places.