Nautical News: For the week of February 19, 2017

ALL HANDS LOST ON ALASKAN CRAB BOAT

 

The United States Coast Guard has suspended its search for the 92 foot crabbing vessel Destination with 6 fishermen aboard, which sent out an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) alert early on February 11th from Alaska’s Bering Sea. Destination’s home port was Seattle, Washington. No mayday call was ever received by the Coast Guard who rushed to the area of where the emergency signal came from. Upon arriving on scene, the Coast Guard found buoys, tarps, and a life-ring belonging to the fishing vessel Destination, along with a sheen of oil. However no crewmembers were found after the Coast Guard searched a total of 5,730 square nautical miles. Other fishing boats also participated in the search. Friends of the lost crew said they worked very hard, were very experienced, and the best at what they did.

 

2016 TABOR ACADEMY DIES IN DIVING ACCIDENT ABOARD TABOR SCHOONER

 

U.S. Coast Guard officials in the U.S. Virgin Islands said that it could take up to a year to complete their investigation of a 2016 Tabor Academy graduate who recently died two weeks ago in a snorkeling accident while working as a crew member on the academy’s Tabor Boy schooner. The young man had been free-diving and suffered what is known as shallow-water blackout while collecting data about coral reefs in the region. According to scientific journals, shallow-water blackout is often triggered by holding one’s breath for long periods of time resulting in the lack of oxygen in the bloodstream and an increase in carbon dioxide. This causes the diver to lose consciousness and the inhalation of water. According military people, shallow water blackout happens more frequently to very fit divers under the age of 40. Tabor Academy is located in Marion, Massachusetts.

 

DEAD DOLPHIN CALF FOUND ON NANTASKET BEACH

 

A beach walker on Nantasket Beach spotted a dead dolphin calf that had washed ashore. The New England Aquarium was called and sent its Marine Animal Rescue Team to pick it up. The 4 foot, 86 pound female calf, estimated to be about 6 months old, was taken to the rescue team’s Quincy shipyard facility for a necropsy. It was believed that the calf was still dependent upon her mother and that the mother had died from age or disease. Researchers said marine mammal deaths in the northeast rise sharply this time of year, but even in death, the calf will help aquarium biologists learn more about other dolphins’ life. Thousands of dolphins live year round off the coast of New England.

 

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED TO COUNT HERRING

 

The North and South Rivers Watershed Association is seeking volunteers from the end of March through the end of May to count herring. The counting will be done 7 days a week, six to nine times a day, at five different locations. These counts will help to monitor trends in the local herring population. Volunteers are needed that can commit to doing 10 minute counts, ideally several times a week, during a specific time period, at one of five sites in Marshfield, Scituate, and Pembroke. A mandatory training session is required for new volunteers. To get involved go to the North and South Rivers watershed Association’s web site – NSRWA.org.

 

THREE SNOWMOBILERS DIE AFTER FALLING THROUGH ICE

 

Anyone thinking of snowmobiling up north better think twice. Officials in New Hampshire are warning all snowmobilers that three people died last weekend after falling through the ice while riding on Lake Winnipesaukee. A 15-year-old boy and his father on a snowmobile fell through the ice. The father suffered hypothermia and survived, but his son died. Three other snowmobilers also fell through the ice. Only one of them survived. Fish and Game recommended snowmobilers to go slowly and follow existing tracks. Before crossing snow covered ice, holes should be cut in the ice to see if it is safe.

 

ANOTHER CRUISE SHIP PASSENGER GOES OVERBOARD

 

A 24 year old man was seen going overboard from the 11th deck of the Carnival Elation cruise ship’s closed-circuit security system. At the time, the ship was in the Bahamas, 15 miles southwest of Abaco while enroute to Nassau. The Coast Guard was notified and searched more than 1,381 square miles with helicopters for more than nine hours before calling off the search.

 

DNA SAMPLES SHOW NATURAL BOOM-BUST CYCLES OF FISH POPULATIONS

 

NOAA scientists that new methods for counting forage fish show there were natural extreme boom-bust cycles for centuries. At least three species off the U.S. West Coast repeatedly experienced steep population increases followed by steep declines, going back to the year 1000, long before commercial fishing began. The species included sardines, anchovies, and hake. One of the new methods for counting fish used DNA to examine fish scales collected on the bottom of the ocean. So many scales were dated between the years 1000 to 1500AD, that scientists could determine boom and bust population cycles. The findings will have implications for the ecosystem, fishermen, and fisheries managers.

 

AMERICA’S CUP CHAMPION SHOWS OFF BOAT IT WILL USE IN 2017 RACE

 

America’s Cup champion Oracle Team USA unveiled the boat it will race in the 2017 America’s Cup. The unveiling marked another step in Larry Ellison’s Oracle’s pursuit of claiming the America’s Cup for a third consecutive time. Oracle’s wing-sailed catamaran is nearly 50 feet long with a wing height of about 79 feet. The boat’s hulls lift out of the water on hydrofoils, allowing the boat to reach speeds of up to 60 mph. The boats in this year’s America’s Cup race are smaller than the 72 footers used in the 2015 America’s Cup race and will have a smaller crew limited to six. This year there will be five teams challenging Oracle for the cup. The challengers are Artemis Racing from Sweden, Emirates Team from New Zealand, Groupama Team from France, Land Rover BAR from Britain and Softbank Team from Japan. The 35th America’s Cup Match begins June 17 in Bermuda.

 

FOOTBALL PLAYER USES “CATCH” TO OPEN SEAFOOD RESTAURANT

 

And last on today’s nautical news, New England Patriots star, Julian Edleman, who made that unbelievable catch in the Super Bowl game, has released a video that shows he is thinking about another kind of a catch – fishing. Edelman said a lightbulb went off in his head about opening a chain of seafood restaurants called Edelman’s Catch. What a great idea! We will remember that catch the rest of our lives.


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