Nautical News: For the week of April 8, 2018

NEW BEDFORD FISHERMEN SWITCH GROUNDFISH SECTORS

 

Groundfish sectors have to submit their operation plans to NOAA before the start of each fishing year, listing the names of boats and the rules under which they will fish. Last year, after Carlos “the Codfather” Rafael pled guilty and admitted that vessels associated with him had lied about the number of fish they caught, NOAA suspended the operating permit for sector IX. NOAA also ordered Sector IX to deduct the number of fish illegally harvested from its 2018 catch share quota in order to pay back those fish to other sectors. It now appears that the fishermen have outsmarted the government. On March 26th, the final day for the groundfish sectors to file their operation plans, NOAA got letters from New Bedford’s Sectors VII, VIII, and IX. Sector VII stated that all the boats in Sector VII last year were leaving and that 16 of those boats were joining Sector VIII. All but 3 of the 55 boats in Sector IX said they were leaving Sector IX to join Sector VII, and that the three remaining boats in Sector IX would not do any fishing. Instead they would just lease whatever quota they had.

 

ZERO GULF OF MAINE COD FOR RECREATIONAL FISHERMEN

 

The Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries just announced the recreational fishing limits for Gulf of Maine cod. The rules apply within all state waters north of the 42° latitude line as well as all state-waters of Cape Cod Bay and the Cape Cod Canal. The rules continue to prohibit the landing of Gulf Of Maine cod by anglers on board for-hire vessels in state waters and on May 1st will apply to all anglers in private boats. Again, as of May 1st, it will be unlawful for any recreational angler to retain or land Gulf Of Maine cod while in Massachusetts or federal waters.

 

CAPE COD HIGH SCHOOL SAILORS SAVED FROM WATER

 

Four St. John Paul II high school students were pulled from the water Friday afternoon after their sailboats capsized in Lewis Bay near the Hyannis Yacht Club. The sailors were participating in a sailing class even though strong winds and snow fell earlier in the day. The Hyannis Fire Department was called to the scene to treat them for possible hypothermia when they returned to shore. Fortunately, no sailors were injured or required any medical treatment. School officials said all sailors had passed swimming and capsizing tests and were wearing life jackets. They thanked the coaches for responding swiftly.

 

INTERIOR SECRETARY ZINKE WANTS MORE ACCESS FOR BOATS

 

Department of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke spoke at the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council in Washington D.C. and had a specific message for U.S. boat owners. He said, “Boats are good and a lot of boats are better.” Zinke said he would focus on improving access and visitor facilities at our federal parks and “bring them into the 21st century.” In order to accomplish these goals, he said he would rely upon advice from recreational boaters and the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council.

 

ELVER SEASON UNDERWAY IN MAINE

 

Maine has the only legal significant fishery for elvers in the United States, and since the elver season opened on March 22nd, the price-per-pound for the baby eels has hit a record high. The average price being paid for a pound of elvers was $2,511 per pound. As of April 1st, a total of 559 pounds of elvers have been caught totaling nearly 1 1/2 million dollars. The elver season ends on June 7th. Prior to 2014, the fishery had no catch limits, but after a series of record catches totaling over of 20,000 pounds, the Atlantic State Marine Fisheries Commission set the state’s catch limit at 9,688 pounds. By the way, Japan is one of the primary markets for the baby eels.

 

CORAL IN FISH TANK GIVES OFF POISONOUS TOXIC FUMES

 

Here is a warning to all aquarium owners with coral in their tank. A family of ten people and two dogs were poisoned after the homeowner scrubbed a piece of coral that was inside his fish tank. He said he never knew that fumes released from coral are the world’s “second deadliest” toxin. Scientists said scrubbing coral releases deadly fumes known as palytoxin. The family all had fevers and difficulty of breathing, and when the dogs displayed similar symptoms, the family knew something was wrong and called 911. Four first responders also immediately became ill and were hospitalized with the family. Doctors expect everyone to recover and said palytoxin is the second deadliest poison in the world. One gram can kill 80 people if it is ingested. Wondering what the deadliest toxin in the world is? It is used to make botox, the skin tightener.

 

20 YEAR OLD CAPTAIN OF 91 FOOT YACHT BACKS OVER GUEST

 

Twenty year old Mauricio Alvarez was the operator of a 91 foot yacht named Miami Vice when he put the engines in reverse while a guest was in the water, fatally running over the person. Florida officials are investigating the accident and so far have determined that alcohol was not a factor. It was not clear whether or not Alvarez was the owner of the yacht, but Florida officials said no captain’s license was required if the yacht was not being chartered. The minimum age to obtain a U.S. Coast Guard captain’s license for an uninspected vessel is 18 and for an inspected vessel it is 19.

 

VOLVO OCEAN RACE COMING TO NEWPORT, RI

 

The round-the-world Volvo Ocean Race will make its only North American stopover next month May 8th thru the 20th when the boats arrived there from Brazil. Fort Adams State Park in Newport will once again be home to the race village hosting the boats and their crews. The festival will be open to the public for free and will feature entertainment for the whole family. On-the-water activities and sailing events will also be scheduled for each day.

 

PACIFIC GARBAGE PATCH BIGGER THAN PREVIOUSLY THOUGHT

 

And last on today’s nautical news, the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” stretches between California and Hawaii. It covers an area more than double the size of Texas. New research shows that there is a lot more garbage in this patch than previously thought. Scientists believe that there are about 79,000 tons of plastic in this patch and that tsunamis that have hit Japan have contributed about a third of the mess based on writings found on the plastic. Scientists explained that the floating patch of garbage gathers together because of the Earth’s rotation, which creates water circulation around the equator that, in turn, powers clockwise currents in this area. However, as big as this patch is, it doesn’t account for the garbage and plastic that sinks to the bottom.


Reach Thousands of Potential Customers on The South Shore and Beyond! Call WATD Today for More Info on Radio and Internet Advertising: (781) 837-1166

watd signal 2017 small

Advertising


About WATD Web Editor

WATD online and on air contributors include, but are not limited to: The Associated Press, Precision Weather Forecasting, local news stringers and reporters, in-house news and internet media staff, State House and town hall reporters, freelance reporters, special feature reporters and producers, and on air radio hosts and personnel.