Nautical News: For the week of June 3, 2018

COAST GUARD HAS CHANGE OF COMMAND

 

Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft handed command of the agency over to Adm. Karl Schultz at U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington D.C. President Trump presided over the ceremony and said these words. Karl Schultz is the Coast Guard’s 26th Commandant.

 

FORMER COAST GUARD ADMIRAL TO ADVISE PRESIDENT

 

In another change in the administration, President Trump has picked Coast Guard Rear Adm. Doug Fears to be his new homeland security adviser. Admiral Fears was the former Coast Guard Atlantic region chief of staff. Fears will now report directly to John Bolton who is now Trump’s new national security adviser. Bolton said Fears would be “my point person on an array of vital tasks,” including supervising the National Security Council’s cyber team.

 

CANADA AND EU TO PLACE TARIFFS ON BOATS

 

Tariffs on Canadian and European Union aluminum will hurt the boating industry according to the National Marine Manufacturers Association’s president Thom Dammrich who claims all types of recreational boats are on the retaliatory lists from both Canada and the EU. He further pointed out that Canada and the EU are the top two export markets for American-made marine products. He concluded that if they retaliate, the Trump Administration’s actions will jeopardize the stability of the marine industry and ultimately harm every American consumer, worker, and business.

 

BRASS GONGS AND BELLS STOLEN OFF CHANNEL MARKERS

 

The Coast Guard is seeking the public’s help in finding brass gongs and bells that have been stolen from buoys off Maine’s coast. Officials said the gongs and bells have been stolen over the past six months and most likely were sold at nautical flea markets or at scrap yards. The thefts put mariners’ lives at risk, cost taxpayers money, and create unnecessary work for Coast Guard personnel. Tampering with an aid to navigation is a federal crime. It’s punishable by fines of up to $25,000 and a prison sentence.

 

BOATERS WARNED ABOUT USING BUOYS FOR TARGET PRACTICE

 

In a related story, the Coast Guard is also urging people to stop using the buoys for target practice, saying shooting at the navigation markers is a federal crime. Recently, two buoys off Block Island that were shot full of holes, sank creating a hazard to navigation. The Coast Guard said intentionally damaging aids to navigation is a crime that could be punished by up to 20 years in prison.

 

MASSACHUSETTS LOBSTER PROCESSING BILL PASSES IN SENATE

 

The Massachusetts senate unanimously passed an amendment sponsored by state senator Bruce Tarr that would lift limits on lobster processing, sale, and transportation within Massachusetts. Currently, lobstermen and seafood vendors in Massachusetts are required to send lobster out of state, either to Maine or Canada for processing. The amendment directs the state’s Division of Marine Fisheries to change the regulations to allow on-shore processing of lobsters in the state, which is second only to Maine in catch in the country.

 

SHARK DETECTING BUOYS RE-INSTALLED

 

As the Great White sharks make their way north to feed off New England, researchers at the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries will be redeploying shark detecting buoys along the Massachusetts shoreline. The detectors will be marked by yellow buoys and will detect any tagged sharks with transmitters that swim within 100 yards of one of these buoys. The public can also monitor the detectors by going to an app called Sharktivity, and this year, the group called the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy will live stream directly from the research boat any shark sightings.

 

SOUTH SHORE STRIPER TOURNAMENT THIS WEEKEND

 

And last on today’s nautical news, the South Shore Striper Tournament, hosted by the North-South Rivers Watershed Association will be held next weekend, starting at 5pm Friday, June 8th, and ending on Sunday at noon, June 10th. There will be three categories for adults and three categories for kids 12 and under. One of the three categories is for fishing on a motorized boat, a second for fishing from shore, and a third category for a paddle boat. The winning catch will be judged on overall length and not weight because this is a catch and release tournament. Participants can register on line or at Belsan Bait and Tackle.


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