Nautical News: For the week of August 19, 2018

HUSBAND NEVER MISSED WIFE WHO FELL OVERBOARD

 

And last on today’s nautical news, a Rhode Island woman was rescued after apparently falling off a sailboat and being stranded for hours on an island in Narragansett Bay. The Coast Guard reported the woman said she fell off her husband’s 39 foot sailboat sometime on Friday afternoon as they were sailing from Newport to East Greenwich. She was later found on Prudence Island around 4 a.m. Saturday morning by a passing boater who heard her cries for help. She appeared to be suffering from mild hypothermia but otherwise was OK. Her husband was found around 2 a.m. that same morning with his sailboat aground. The man told police who are investigating the incident that he thought his wife was below deck and didn’t realize she was missing.

 

WHALE CAPSIZES BOAT

 

A whale a mile off the coast of New Jersey caused a 20 foot boat to capsize throwing the two men on board into the water. The two were drift fishing when the whale suddenly surfaced beneath their boat throwing it into the air. Several nearby boats were in the area and rushed to save the men who were hanging on to a cooler and their overturned boat. Witnesses said the water was full of bait fish which apparently attracted the whale.

 

STOLEN CAR REMOVED FROM NORTH RIVER

One of two stolen cars submerged in the North River under the bridge connecting Norwell’s Bridge Street and Marshfield’s Union Street was successfully removed by a special underwater dive team after an unsuccessful attempt was made earlier this year in May. The underwater marine unit was formed last year, combining the resources of the Quincy, Marshfield, Plymouth, Duxbury, Scituate, Attleboro and Cohasset police departments. At some point, another attempt will be made by the dive team to remove the second car. The vehicle removed was in 7 feet of water. Because of its location, since it was resting against the footings of the bridge, it was thought it could potentially damage the bridge. It was also considered a hazard to navigation, and a potential life threatening situation to anyone jumping off the bridge. Police said there are at least 12 other cars in the water near the bridge. In just a little while, we will hear a more comprehensive report when we speak with Norwell Harbormaster Ron Mott.

 

SHARK BITES MAN ON AN OUTER CAPE COD BEACH

 

Greg Skomal, Massachusetts’ leading shark expert, is trying to determine if the first person to be attacked in waters off the state since 2012 was bitten by a Great White shark. A 61 year old man from Scarsdale, New York was in the water 30 yards off an outer Cape Cod beach in Truro when he was bitten by a shark. He was airlifted to a Boston hospital in serious condition with wounds to his legs and abdomen. Officials ordered the beach closed, and witnesses reported seeing seals in the water just before the attack. There have been 10 great white shark sightings in the past week, and more than 60 over the last month off Cape Cod. The last fatal shark attack in Massachusetts occurred in 1936.

 

BOSTON WATER TAXI COLLIDES WITH SAILBOAT

 

The Coast Guard along with state and local agencies responded to a collision between a water taxi and a sailboat on a mooring ball in Boston Harbor near Long Wharf. The water taxi had seven passengers aboard and one passenger sustained a minor injury to his nose. He was treated at the scene. The sailboat had three people on board none of which were injured. The cause of the accident is under investigation.

 

LED LIGHTS INTERFERE WITH DSC AND AIS RADIO RECEPTION

 

The Coast Guard has received reports from a number of crews, ship owners, inspectors, and boaters regarding poor reception on their VHF radio and as well as their radios’ automatic identification systems because of light emitting diode or LED lights on board their vessels. LED lights are now found in navigation lights, searchlights, interior and underwater lights. The Coast Guard report said the radio frequency interference caused by these LED lights were potential safety hazards. LED lighting installed near VHF antennas has also shown to compound reception problems.

 

NOAA WILL PAY FOR 2018 GROUNDFISH OBSERVERS

 

NOAA Fisheries did the right thing by announcing a plan to cover all at-sea monitoring costs for Northeast groundfish sector vessels for the fishing year 2018. Officials at NOAA said they will also use excess funds to reimburse fishermen another 25% for the fishing year 2017 for their at-sea monitoring expenses. Funds will also be used to support at-sea monitor training and to continue development of electronic monitoring technologies.

 

EPA CLAIMS ETHANOL BAD FOR ENVIRONMENT

 

Officials at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said the making of ethanol from corn and soybeans has become an environmental disaster and is actually making our nation’s air dirtier, and according to mechanics is bad for engines in your car, boat, motorcycle, and equipment. But the damage isn’t just from using the ethanol in our gas. The real damage is from the process involved in making the ethanol causing the loss of millions of acres of natural habitat to grow corn and soybeans, not to mention the carbon dioxide footprint from the farms’ tractors and trucks. Equally bad is the use of agricultural nutrients and chemicals to grow the crops with much of the fertilizers used ending up in our rivers and lakes turning what is supposed to be green energy into brown energy or red tides.

 

FLORIDA DECLARED DISASTER AREA BECAUSE OF RED TIDE

 

And speaking of red tides, red tide continues to choke the southwest Florida coast causing large amounts of dead fish are washing up on the region’s white sand beaches. Governor Rick Scott issued a state of emergency for seven Gulf Coast counties in the path of the red tide bloom. Since August 1st, 300 tons of dead fish were removed from just Sanibel beach. The carcasses ranged in size from small bait fish to a 26-foot-long whale shark. And while red tide poses the biggest threat to animals in the water, just breathing air near the shore can be difficult, especially for humans suffering from asthma or emphysema. Scientists still can’t say when the red tide will go away. Now in its tenth month, this is the longest bloom southwest Florida has experienced in more than a decade.

 

NEW STUDY DOES NOT BODE WELL FOR GULF OF MAINE SHRIMP

 

A new analysis of Gulf of Maine’s shrimp population doesn’t bode well for the future of the fishery which has been closed since 2013. Regulators have scheduled a meeting for this fall to discuss and vote on the subject. Gulf of Maine’s shrimp are smaller, more pinkish, and taste sweeter than shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico. They were previously a popular winter seafood item in New England and around the country before regulators closed the fishery. Regulators say it is not that the Gulf of Maine shrimp don’t exist. The fishery is closed because the status of the stock has not increased since the closure. Years before the closure, more than 10 million pounds were harvested in a single year. Scientists with the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission claim the warming of the water is preventing the animal’s recovery.


Reach Thousands of Potential Customers on The South Shore and Beyond! Call WATD Today for More Info on Radio and Internet Advertising: (781) 837-1166

watd signal 2017 small

Advertising


About WATD Web Editor

WATD online and on air contributors include, but are not limited to: The Associated Press, Precision Weather Forecasting, local news stringers and reporters, in-house news and internet media staff, State House and town hall reporters, freelance reporters, special feature reporters and producers, and on air radio hosts and personnel.