Nautical News: For the week of February 10, 2019

NASA STUDY SHOWS ICE INCREASING IN ANTARCTIC

A new NASA study shows the amount of ice in the Antarctic is increasing from huge amounts of snowfall, despite losses from its thinning glaciers. Scientists claim the expansion has been going on for the past 10,000 years proving that some places on Earth are experiencing global cooling and challenging other studies about global warming. According to the new analysis of satellite data, the Antarctic ice sheet showed a net gain of between 80 to 100 billion tons of ice a year since 1992.

 

ATLANTIC HERRING QUOTA DRASTICALLY CUT

NOAA Fisheries announced that it is cutting this year’s herring quota from nearly 110 million pounds to about 33 million pounds, even though they admitted that Atlantic herring was not overfished. This will have a severe impact on New England lobstermen who use herring for bait in their traps. The reason given for the drastic cut in quota was said to be based on a 2018 herring stock assessment that found the fish’s population declining. The decline alarmed scientists and conservationists because herring plays such a vital role in the ocean food chain.

 

118 MOORINGS PERMITTED FOR BOSTON ISLANDS

Late last year, the Army Corps of Engineers issued a permit to the

Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation for up to 103 recreational boat moorings to be installed around the Boston Harbor Islands. According to the group known as Boston Harbor Now, the DCR will begin installing those moorings this Spring. In addition, Boston Harbor Now intends to apply for up to 15 moorings at Spectacle Island for a grand total of 118 new recreational moorings for the 2019 season. The moorings can be reserved on the DOCKWA Marine Reservation System on your smartphone or online. The reservation form for the islands should be available for access by boaters in mid-spring.

 

SCALLOP BOAT SINKS IN NEW BEDFORD

The Coast Guard is investigating the sinking of the Moonraker, a 45-foot scallop boat, while it was tied up in New Bedford Harbor. The boat had 100 gallons of fuel on board though much of it was kept from spilling into the water due to the deployment of a boom. The sinking was reported to the Coast Guard at about 8:15 a.m. by other nearby boats. The vessel was refloated by the owner, who was not on board but in the area, and no injuries occurred. It was reported that the boat is now land for repairs.

 

COAST GUARD OFFLOADS 35000 POUNDS OF COCAINE

And speaking of the Coast Guard, nearly 35,000 pounds of cocaine seized from smugglers on fishing boats were off-loaded in Fort Lauderdale. One Coast Guard officer said that he had been doing this for 18 years and thought this was one of his most successful drug patrols. The drugs had a wholesale value of roughly $466 million. Coast Guard Admiral Karl Schultz said most of the drugs destined for the U.S. originate in Colombia.

 

FLORIDA RELEASES 16,000 REDFISH INTO GULF

More than 16,000 juvenile redfish and 250 adult redfish will be released into southwest Florida waters in an effort to recover the thousands of animals killed by red tide. More than 2,000 tons of marine wildlife washed ashore as a “red tide” algae bloom choked Florida’s Gulf Coast for months last year. Now scientists say the water is clean and it is safe for marine life and humans to go in the water after spending more than $8 million in cleanup costs.

 

55,000 POUNDS OF IMPORTED CATFISH RECALLED IN U.S.

A United States importer is recalling more than 55,000 pounds of catfish from Vietnam. Maxfield Seafood is recalling around 55,300 pounds of frozen catfish products that were not presented for inspection by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service. The catfish products, imported from Vietnam on various dates from April 2018, through December 2018, were distributed to retailers nationwide. The agency is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ freezers. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.


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