Nautical News: For the week of April 14, 2019

DISCOVERY OF FISH FOSSILS TELL WHAT KILLED DINOSAURS

 

The discovery of some fossilized fish may tell the story about what happened the day an asteroid hit the earth and killed all the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. The impact wiped out about 75 percent of the animal and plant species living on Earth at the time, including all the dinosaurs. The preserved fossils, some of which are of fish with hot glass in their gills, were found in a mountainside in North Dakota and are thought to have formed after a 6 mile wide asteroid crashed in Mexico. Scientists said the fish fossils offer the first-ever “detailed snapshot of the terrible moments right after the Chicxulub impact — the most cataclysmic event known to have befallen life on Earth.” The whole report is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

FISH SLIME FIGHTS BACTERIA

 

Scientists are studying how fish slime can fight bacteria and drug-resistant pathogens in humans. In fact the slime of the Pacific pink perch has been tested to defeat colon carcinoma cells. Fish slime isn’t the only animal-derived sticky stuff being studied for humans. Scientists are also studying frog tongues. In fact for years, Korean and South American beauty companies have marketed cosmetics containing snail slime that supposedly reduced wrinkles, boost moisture, and quickly healed wounds. Even ancient Greeks used it to reduce skin inflammation. Beauty products containing snail slime can cost hundreds of dollars. A Manhattan plastic surgeon charges $375 for one treatment of snail slime.

 

DOG DIES BUT TWO MEN RESCUED AFTER KAYAK CAPSIZES

 

This past week, two men and a dog in a kayak had to be rescued in Boston harbor after their kayak capsized and sank. The men swam in 40 degree water to a nearby buoy, climbed atop of it, and waited to be rescued. It was reported that somebody on a tour of the JFK Library using binoculars spotted the men hanging on to the buoy and called the Coast Guard. A nearby Boston police boat responded and found the men suffering from severe hypothermia. The men said they were hanging on to the buoy for over an hour. Unfortunately their dog had died in the water. The men were transported to a local hospital for treatment. Police said they two men had launched their kayak from Carson Beach and made it out into Dorchester Bay near Thompson Island when strong winds and choppy seas “became overwhelming.” They tried to turn back, only to have their kayak capsize.

 

MAN FOUND IN WATER IN BOSTON’S FORT POINT CHANNEL

 

And last night, Boston firefighters rushed to the Fort Point Channel in Boston to save a man clinging to some pylons in the water. Divers in survival suits went into the water underneath the Summer Street Bridge to rescue the man and pull him from the freezing water. It was not clear how the man ended up in the water or how long he was there. His age and identity were not released. He was transported to the hospital and treated for hypothermia.

 

 

GULF OF MAINE HADDOCK SEASON OPENS APRIL 15TH

 

Although the Gulf of Maine haddock fishing season reopens on April 15th, recreational fishing rules for cod and haddock remain in effect until May 1st, the start of the 2019 season. So, possession of cod is still prohibited and the minimum size of a haddock is still 17 inches with a bag limit of 12. There has been talk that New England Fishery Management Council will recommended one cod beginning May 1st, but again as of now 2018 regulations will remain in effect until they are replaced.

 

COAST GUARD CONDUCTING WATERWAYS SURVEY

 

Coast Guard Sector Northern New England is conducting a Waterways Analysis and Management Survey from April 01 through June 30. This study will focus on the aids to navigation system, waterborne commerce, marine casualty information, port/harbor resources, emergency response plans, and future development projects. The Coast Guard will be releasing a survey to users of the waterways. Look for it in the mail, online, or at your local marina, boat ramp or yacht club.

 

400,000 SALMON DIE IN HATCHERY FROM HUMAN ERROR

 

Nearly 400,000 fall Chinook salmon died last week due to a mistake at the Coleman National Fish Hatchery in California. Water to the pen was accidentally turned off overnight and the mistake was not discovered until the morning. The salmon were less than half-a-year old and died due to a lack of oxygen according to a hatchery official. However, nearly 5 million fish, more than 10 times the amount of fish that died last week, were previously released this season.

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