Nautical News: For the week of May 12, 2019

MARSHFIELD FISHERMAN JOINS SEAPORT ECONOMIC COUNCIL

 

Marshfield fisherman Ed Barrett is joining the Seaport Economic Council after an additional seat was added to the council last week. Ed Barrett will represent the Massachusetts Fishermen’s Partnership. The added seat was recommended by state Rep. Patrick Kearney and state Senator Patrick O’Connor. Governor Baker amended the council’s charter to include the additional seat. Rep Kearney said that the extra seat will make sure fishermen will have a voice when decisions are being made about our coastal economy. The council’s grant program has given out millions of dollars in the last four years and has helped with a number of local projects, including Marshfield’s new harbormaster building. In 2018, the town was granted $95,000 to conduct a feasibility study on its aging piers, wharves, and supportive concrete revetment walls.

 

NEW MASSACHUSETTS ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS SECRETARY

 

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker announced the departure of Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Matthew Beaton, and introduced the current Undersecretary of Climate Change, Kathleen Theoharides, as the new incoming Secretary. While Secretary Beaton was in charge, the Commonwealth encouraged renewable energy technologies leading to the largest offshore wind farm proposals in the United States off the coast of Massachusetts. Theoharides, a field biologist, was promoted to Undersecretary in 2019, and continued to lead the Commonwealth’s efforts on climate change. She began her policy career working in Washington, D.C. at the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition and Defenders of Wildlife.

 

SCIENTISTS SAY MORE RESEARCH NEEDED FOR OFFSHORE WINDFARM

 

Scientists are among the growing group who are now concerned about how little research has been done before Vineyard Wind begins pile driving and dredging for their wind farm. NOAA officials also responded sharply to Vineyard Wind’s Draft Environmental Impact Statement stating that many of the company’s statements relating to the scale of impacts for biological and socioeconomic resources were not well supported. NOAA said that related to fish and fisheries, there was limited analysis regarding mortality, injury, and behavioral impacts, particularly spawning activity for relevant species and potential loss in catch resulting from pile driving activities.

 

FLORIDA FISHERMAN GETS FLESH EATING DISEASE FROM FISH HOOK

 

A Florida man who contracted a rare flesh-eating disease from a fish hook is sharing his story in hopes it will prevent someone else from suffering a similar experience. During a recent fishing trip in mid-April, the fisherman accidentally stuck his hand with a fish hook. With help from friends, the hook was removed and he continued to fish. The next day he was in so much pain he went to an urgent care facility and they prescribed him an antibiotic. His condition continued to get worse, so he went to the hospital where doctors diagnosed him with a life-threatening flesh eating disease that had spread from his hand up his arm. He spent the next two weeks in the hospital where doctors searched for a cure. Fortunately for him, the doctors said they caught the disease just in time before it resulted in amputation of his arm or maybe death. The fisherman is now home recovering and already thinking about the next fishing tournament. He warns all fishermen to seek medical attention right away if you get stuck by a fish hook or cut by a fish filet knife.

 

TWO TEENAGERS RESCUED BY BOAT NAMED AMEN AFTER PRAYING

 

Two Florida teenagers are counting their blessings after they were rescued after going for a swim and got caught in a strong ocean current that dragged them out about 2 miles from the beach. They linked arms and floated together and prayed for help. After more than an hour, their prayers were answered by the crew on a 53 foot yacht named “Amen.” The captain of Amen said it was a miracle he saw the two because of the big waves. They were shivering and could barely speak when he got them on board. When they realized the boat’s name was Amen, the first words out of their mouths were, “God is real.” The Coast Guard was called and brought the boys back safely to shore.

 

THE INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF THE SALMON

 

This is the International Year of the Salmon. It was created to bring countries together to share knowledge and raise public awareness to protect salmon and the communities and cultures that depend on them. Salmon in the Northwest Pacific are thriving with numerous salmon and steelhead species. Now scientists say there is hope for Atlantic salmon which are listed as endangered. A satellite tag just recently popped off from an Atlantic salmon that was tagged in Greenland in 2018. It showed that the fish had swum from Geenland to the United States to spawn in a New England river. Scientists said only 1% of salmon in Greenland are from the United States, so tagging a U.S. origin fish, having it survive its migration and receiving the data back, is very exciting news.

 

COAST GUARD ADMIRAL GIVES STRATEGIC OUTLOOK FOR ARCTIC

 

The Coast Guard’s Pacific Area commander, Vice Admiral Linda Fagan, discussed the service’s new Arctic Strategic Outlook and Polar Security Cutters. She said the distance and the harsh Arctic climate pose significant challenges to agencies charged with providing maritime safety and security to Americans, including the hundreds of villages and thousands of seasonal workers in the U.S. Arctic. Search and rescue, law enforcement, marine safety, waterways management, and other Coast Guard missions are complicated by the Arctic’s dynamic environment. The Coast Guard has been the sole provider of the nation’s polar ice breaking capability since 1965, and is seeking to increase its ice breaking fleet with six new polar security cutters. Previously to becoming the Pacific Area Commander, Admiral Fagan served as the Commanding Officer of the First Coast Guard District and has roots in Boston’s south shore.

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